2016 Bird A Day Challenge Wrap Up

2016 Bird A Day Challenge Wrap Up

Every year since I’ve started birding, I’ve undertaken a new challenge for the year.  2014 was all about doing a Big Learning Year and in 2015, I began what is probably a lifelong project of getting 100 different species in every parish (county) in Louisiana.  For 2016, I took the Bird a Day challenge which challenges you to see how many days in a row you can go seeing a new species of bird each day.

DSC_4669

Reddish Egret (Day 199 ) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, FL.

Rules
The challenge itself comes from the website linked here and is to see one new bird a day for the most possible consecutive days.  Each day you will pick a bird that you have seen that day and add it to your list (see website) for that date.  That is not to say that you need to see a new bird for the year each day, only that you can only “count” one per day.  So, let’s say first day I see 10 species in my yard including a Blue Jay.  I pick Blue Jay for my first day.  The next day, I see the same birds.  I can choose any of those birds except Blue Jay for my 2nd day and so on and so on.  Only free-flying birds count, so no zoo birds, pets or livestock however, this challenge is far more lenient than an ABA style listing event and even normally non-countable exotics are allowed.  Obviously, strategy would be important.

monk parakeet - 2016.05.18 - Metairie, LA

Monk Parakeet (Day 30). They’re an exotic introduced species in the New Orleans area that prefers to build large stick nests around electrical grid infrastructure.

Strategy
When I started in January, my only real strategy was to go ahead and knock out any life birds, rare birds and hard to find birds as soon as possible.  I decided planning could come later.  I travel about 50% of the time for my job but I could already tell that the hardest part of the challenge would be days where I was stuck inside.  It was important that I save as many easy birds as possible for those days.  Weekends were for targeting common yet hard to find or time-consuming birds like Swainson’s Warbler, nocturnal birds or beach-goers (nearest beach was 1-hr away).

short-billed dowitcher - 2016.07.17 - Merritt Island NWR, FL

Short-billed Dowitcher. Seen several times, but I was always too busy with some other beach birds.

Around the end of January, it became pretty obvious that I was going to miss a lot of ducks and I needed to plan better going forward.  I downloaded the official Louisiana State Bird List from the Louisiana Ornithological Society.  I converted the list into a spreadsheet and immediately separated out the review list species to count as bonuses.  The real list I was after was whatever was regularly seen in Louisiana year to year.  I simplified the list by tagging them all as “winter”, “summer”, and “migration”.

eastern phoebe - 2016.06.19 - Lake of the Ozarks, MO

Eastern Phoebe (Day 49). A winter regular in Louisiana. The one shown here was seen in the summer in Missouri.

While I continued to work on my winter birds list, I kept spring migration in mind as I had no real confidence that I was going to make it to fall migration.  That was going to be a key time from April to May with a huge number of species coming through in waves with a limited amount of time in which to see them.  During migration it wasn’t only important to get out every day, but to get to migration stops every day.

Summer would be the slow and steady countdown to the end.  I had originally not planned on being able to make it past May and my planning was a little lax.  I spent most of the summer narrowing down my spreadsheet and marking the easiest birds in bright yellow to try to avoid getting those first.  Every day, I would try to pick a piece of habitat that was both a quick stop on my way to/from work but also an appropriate place to look for some of the species I had remaining.  Vacation and work travel days would be reserved for things I probably couldn’t easily get at home.

inca dove - 2016.06.28 - Jonesville, LA-001

Inca Dove (Day 180). A small dove with a scaly appearance to the feathers. This one near Jonesville, LA flew into the tree I was working beside. I noticed a few minutes later that its mate was sitting on its nest on top of a light pole nearby.

Results
I finally ended the challenge on July 27, 2016.  I had 244 species for the year of which I was able to see a new one every day for 209 days.  I saw fifteen life birds.

I spent the first week doing the familiar scramble that most birders do near the first of the year, filling up their year lists.  I decided to chase down some life birds and got a Surf Scoter in MS on day 1.  Day 2, I went after a Brown-crested Flycatcher at Chalmette Battlefield Cemetery and came away with Groove-billed Ani, the flycatcher and a Clay-coloured Sparrow, none of which I would see again during the challenge.

surf scoter - 2016.01.01 - Pass Christian, MS

Surf Scoter (Day 1). These odd looking ducks were a first for me although they’re spotted annually on the Gulf Coast in winter. These were seen in Pass Christian, MS behind a popular beach side restaurant and fishing pier.

I had a near record amount of job travel in the first three months of the year.  Most days after work rather than spending time at the hotel, I would seek out nearby National Wildlife Refuges and Wildlife Management Areas.  I watched the LABird listserv list for rarities in my area and got to photograph and record a lifer Couch’s Kingbird in Vermilion Parish.  My time in central Louisiana really helped with ducks at the Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge and also saw wintering Rusty Blackbird and Brewer’s Blackbird which I almost always miss during migration in south Louisiana.

rusty blackbird - 2016.01.27 - Jonesville, LA-001

Rusty Blackbird (Day 27) female. This species is seen with other blackbirds along with cowbirds and starlings each winter in central Louisiana. Huge mixed flocks roam the wide expanse of agricultural lands and even rural lawns like this one near Jonesville, LA. The other option for Rusty Blackbirds is to hang around bottomland hardwood habitat during their migration and get lucky.

The most difficult time came just before migration in March.  I was running out of winter birds and there weren’t yet any migrating birds.  I kept after rarities but I started counting really common things for the first time and it felt a little weird.  In retrospect, this is the period where I really cut this challenge short by missing the lingering winter birds.

broad-billed hummingbird - 2016.02.22 - Marrero, LA

Broad-billed Hummingbird (Day 53). James Beck helped me find this beauty at his stake out in a Marrero, LA woodlot. Broad-billed Hummingbirds are rare and treated as a review list species in Louisiana.

As soon as spring migration hit, the field work dried up. It was time for staring at a computer for 8 hours a day.  In my business, it seems like an unwritten law where if the weather is nice, you’ll be stuck inside.  However, I was very surprised to find that even in the urban landscape of the New Orleans Central Business District (CBD), there were migrating songbirds to be found.  Every day, I’d take a walk and hit a few green spots between the concrete where I found Ovenbird, Prothonotary, Tennessee, Yellow-rumped, Hooded and Worm-eating Warblers along with White-eyed and Red-eyed Vireos.

kentucky warbler - 2016.04.01 - Lake Road Lacombe, LA

Kentucky Warbler (Day 96). This particular one was during a weather related fallout on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain in Lacombe.

The CBD was great for filling in gaps on busy days but I had to visit migrant traps.  If I had time in the morning, I’d visit nearby spots in New Orleans like Coturie Arboretum and West End Park, bird for 30 minutes and head to work.  I manged to see all our migrating thrushes, tanagers, buntings and grosbeaks as well as another lifer Black-billed Cuckoo.  As the songbird migrations would became stagnate, I would alternate for shorebirds.

ovenbird - 2016.04.27 - Coturie Arboretum New Orleans, LA

Ovenbird (Day 106). These skulking forest species can be found in Coturie Arboretum in New Orleans fairly regularly during spring migration but it can involve a lot of patient sitting off the well beaten trails.

My favorite shorebird/wading bird spot came from Peter Yaukey’s blog: Birding Made Easy New Orleans.  It was a set of random rainwater retention ponds in the urban core of Metairie that was not only a shorebird/wading bird magnet, but only a 5 minute detour on the way to work.  I got a life bird White-rumped Sandpiper along with finding normally out of the way birds like Stilt Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, Solitary Sandpiper and Western Sandpiper along with almost every heron and egret.

white-rumped sandpiper - 2016.05.10 - Metairie, LA-005

White-rumped Sandpiper (Day 132) with some other peeps at the Metairie shorebird spot.

As migration wound down in the early summer, I decided I had to set limitations on what I would and would not do in pursuit of this challenge.  I have a family, full-time job and I needed time to just relax so I decided that I would not drive more than 30 minutes out of my way just to list something.  I also decided that if at any point I was not having fun, I would not do it.
Regardless of the challenge, I take a half day every other weekend to go birding/hiking for exercise and meditation.  It’s done wonders for my health and sanity.  No problem fitting in some tough birds to that already established routine.

swainson's warbler - 2016.07.04 - Old River WMA, MS-001

Swainson’s Warbler (Day 186). One of my planned birding trips to Old River WMA in Pearl River County, MS I had three potential targets in mind: Swainson’s Warbler, Swallow-tailed Kite, and Acadian Flycatcher. I thought if I was lucky, I’d hear this secretive warbler singing. I guess I got very lucky, because one posed just beside the road for me.

A family vacation to the Missouri Ozarks was not exactly a premier summer birding destination but provided me with a week worth of things I didn’t expect to list.  We took a quick pit stop on the way to the St. Louis Zoo (fabulous by the way) to see a Eurasian Tree Sparrow building a nest on someone’s porch.  At and on the way to the Lake of the Ozarks I got a few species I should’ve gotten in Louisiana like White-breasted Nuthatch, Hairy Woodpecker, Dickcissel, Prairie Warbler and a Warbling Vireo (Mammoth Spring State Park, AK).

eurasian tree sparrow - 2016.06.18 - St. Louis, MO-002

Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Day 170). The less successful version of the House Sparrow, Eurasian Tree Sparrows were also introduced in Europe but never made it out of the midwest.

As I was finishing up in July, a training class over the weekend in Florida allowed me to get a few more life birds like Florida-Scrub Jay, Limpkin, Muscovy Duck (established feral) and the exotic Blue-crowned Parakeet (not ABA countable).  Of course, I was so busy with training, I got those all on Friday.  I counted Sandhill Crane (Florida) on Saturday from the Orlando airport lakes park and a Reddish Egret from Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday before catching a flight back home (which was of course, delayed by weather).

Florida Scrub Jay - 2016.07.15 - Jonathan Dickinson State Park, FL

Florida Scrub-Jay (Day 197). These Florida endemics get the honor of being the species I drove the farthest to see during this whole challenge. I was staying in Orlando but drove all the way down to Jonathan Dickenson State Park which is about a 3 hour drive.

Big Misses
Seeing a new bird every day is hard and requires lots of planning.  The species I saw and see commonly but somehow didn’t fit them into my list really fall into three categories: procrastination(lacking the will), not understanding distribution and random dumb luck.

  • Procrastination/Lacked the Will:
    Acadian Flycatcher, Clapper Rail, Swallow-tailed Kite, Sanderling, Eastern Meadowlark, Dunlin, Ring-necked Duck, Northern Harrier, Short-billed Dowitcher, all the plovers (except Killdeer)
    I should have gotten all these species with ease, however, most of them would have required over 30 minutes of travel (weekend birds) and the month+ worth of weekends I could have spent going out and finding them was better spent with family.
  • Didn’t Understand Distribution:
    Tree Swallow, Greater Yellowlegs, Blue-winged Teal, Dunlin.
    I honestly thought I could find all these species during the summer with ease.  These were real learning experiences for me.  Some things just don’t stick in your mind until you’re forced to confront them.
  • Random Dumb Luck:
    Blue-headed Vireo, American Pipit, Yellow Warbler, White-winged Dove, Wilson’s Snipe.
    These are species that I usually see but ended up only seeing on a day where I saw something else that I thought would be harder to see.  The Wilson’s Snipe was another story.  Early on, I had seen so many, I assumed I had listed it already.  By the time I got around to sorting my list, I noticed it wasn’t on there and they were all gone.  We’ll chalk that one up to clerical error.

Conclusion

I learned a LOT about Louisiana bird distribution (for example, Tree Swallows leave for the summer!).  Just going through the exercise of trying to organize finding as many birds as I did on certain days in certain locations honed my understanding of bird habitats, behavior and distribution.  I’d look at my list of species left for the year and decide what it was doing (nesting, migrating, etc) and where I was likely to find it.  Then I’d have to go locate it. This was very different birding than I was used to where I’d show up somewhere because it seemed interesting, or people said it had good birds and I’d see what happened.  This time, everything was targeted. I had expectations of what I’d see and if I didn’t see it, I’d have to go back to the drawing board and figure out where I’d steered wrong.

So, I began this challenge, not because I wanted to compete with anyone for biggest list, but because I love birding and wanted to challenge myself to learn as much as possible while having a good time.
The stamina involved in this challenge was intense.  I can be a tad obsessive  and a bit of a perfectionist which made things more stressful than they should have been. There were times where I wanted to quit but I took a step back, thought of the reasons I was doing this and set reasonable limits for myself.  I was doing this for fun and to learn and didn’t need to stress if I didn’t do everything perfectly.  All in all, just for what I learned, I’d say it was worth it.  Am I going to do this again? Definitely not!
Maybe when I retire…

Here’s the final list.  Life birds are listed in red.  Photos from this post are all from 2016 and taken by me although not necessarily on the day I listed the bird.

  1. Jan. 1: Surf Scoter – Pass Christian, Harrison, MS
  2. Jan. 2: Groove-billed Ani – Chalmette Battlefield Cemetery – St. Bernard, LA
    groove-billed ani - 2016.01.02 - Chalmette, LA
  3. Jan. 3: Tropical Kingbird – Eastover abandoned golf course – Orleans, LA
  4. Jan. 4: Brown Creeper – New Orleans City Park – Orleans, LA
  5. Jan. 5: Sedge Wren – near Erath – Vermilion, LA
  6. Jan. 6: Couch’s Kingbird – Kaplan, Vermilion, LA
  7. Jan. 7: Neotropic Cormorant* – Intracoastal City – Vermilion, LA
  8. Jan. 8: American Bittern – Lake Martin – St. Martin, LA
  9. Jan. 9: Horned Grebe – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
    horned grebe - 2016.01.01 - Pass Christian, MS
  10. Jan. 10: Green-winged Teal – Ponchatoula Water Treatment Plant – Tangipahoa, LA
  11. Jan. 11: Hermit Thrush – Bancker Grotto – Vermilion Parish, LA
  12. Jan. 12: House Wren – near Erath – Vermilion, LA
  13. Jan. 13: Greater White-fronted Goose – Kaplan – Vermilion, LA
  14. Jan. 14: Hooded Merganser – Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge – Concordia, LA
  15. Jan. 15: Brewer’s Blackbird – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
  16. Jan. 16: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker – Big Branch National Wildlife Refuge – St. Tammany, LA
  17. Jan. 17: Bufflehead – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  18. Jan. 18: Lesser Scaup – Lake Cocodrie – Concordia, LA
  19. Jan. 19: American White Pelican – Lake Cocodrie – Concordia, LA
  20. Jan. 20: Gadwall – Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge – Concordia, LA
  21. Jan. 21: White-throated Sparrow – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
    white-throated sparrow - 2016.01.02 - Chalmette, LA
  22. Jan. 22: Brown Booby – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  23. Jan. 23: Double-crested Cormorant – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  24. Jan. 24: American Goldfinch – home – St. Tammany, LA
  25. Jan. 25: Snow Goose – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
  26. Jan. 26: Ruddy Duck – Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge – Concordia, LA
  27. Jan. 27: Rusty Blackbird – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
  28. Jan. 28: Northern Shoveler – near Monterey – Concordia, LA
  29. Jan. 29: Pine Warbler – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
    pine warbler - 2015.11.22 - McComb, MS
  30. Jan. 30: Monk Parakeet – New Orleans – Orleans, LA
  31. Jan. 31: Royal Tern – Lake Pontchartrain shore Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  32. Feb. 1: Herring Gull – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  33. Feb. 2: Bald Eagle – I-10 marsh – St. Charles, LA
  34. Feb. 3: Common Loon – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  35. Feb. 4: Song Sparrow – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  36. Feb. 5: Yellow-rumped Warbler – New Orleans CBD – Orleans, LA
  37. Feb. 6: Ruby-crowned Kinglet – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  38. Feb. 7: Sharp-shinned Hawk – Lake Martin – St. Martin, LA
  39. Feb. 8: American Wigeon – Freshwater City – Vermilion, LA
  40. Feb. 9: American Kestrel – Kaplan – Vermilion, LA
  41. Feb. 10: Bonaparte’s Gull – St. James, LA
  42. Feb. 11: Orange-crowned Warbler – St. James, LA
  43. Feb. 12: Common Goldeneye – Lake Road Lacombe – St. Tammany, LA
  44. Feb. 13: Palm Warbler – Pontchartrain Water Treatment Plant – Tangipahoa, LA
  45. Feb. 14: Golden-crowned Kinglet – Northlake Nature Center – St. Tammany, LA
    golden-crowned kinglet - 2016.01.26 - Bayou Cocodrie NWR, LA-001
  46. Feb. 15: Swamp Sparrow – Maurepas Swamp WMA – Ascension, LA
  47. Feb. 16: Pied-billed Grebe – Bayou Chevreuil – St. James, LA
  48. Feb. 17: Belted Kingfisher – Bayou Chevreuil – St. James, LA
    belted kingfisher - 2016.02.17 - St. James Parish, LA
  49. Feb. 18: Eastern Phoebe – Bayou Chevreuil – St. James, LA
  50. Feb. 19: Winter Wren – Bayou Chevreuil – St. James, LA
  51. Feb. 20: Wilson’s Warbler – Marrero Woodlot – Jefferson, LA
  52. Feb. 21: Cooper’s Hawk – Marrero Woodlot – Jefferson, LA
  53. Feb. 22: Broad-billed Hummingbird – Marrero Woodlot – Jefferson, LA
  54. Feb. 23: Ring-billed gull – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  55. Feb. 24: Common Yellowthroat – Bayou Chevreuil – St. James, LA
  56. Feb. 25: Little Blue Heron – Bayou Chevreuil – St. James, LA
  57. Feb. 26: Brown-headed Cowbird – Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center – East Baton Rouge, LA
  58. Feb. 27: Eastern Towhee – Blackwater Conservation Area
  59. Feb. 28: Northern Flicker – Covington – St. Tammany, LA
  60. Feb. 29: American Robin – Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  61. Mar. 1: Brown Thrasher – my house – St. Tammany, LA
    brown-thrasher - 2016.07.15 - Green Cay Wetlands and Nature Center, FL
  62. Mar. 2: Osprey – Bayou Corne – Assumption, LA
  63. Mar. 3: Field Sparrow – Bayou Corne – Assumption, LA
  64. Mar. 4: Savannah Sparrow – Morgan City – St. Mary, LA
  65. Mar. 5: Red-tailed Hawk – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  66. Mar. 6: Fish Crow – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  67. Mar. 7: Northern Parula – Bayou Corne – Assumption, LA
  68. Mar. 8: Common Gallinule – Bayou Borne – Assumption, LA
  69. Mar. 9: Brown Pelican – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  70. Mar. 10: Great Blue Heron – Lake Pontchartrain Causeway – St. Tammany, LA
  71. Mar. 11: Red-headed Woodpecker – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  72. Mar. 12: American Coot – Lake Pontchartrain Lakefront Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  73. Mar. 13: Chipping Sparrow – Waddill wildlife Refuge – East Baton Rouge, LA
  74. Mar. 14: Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  75. Mar. 15: Eurasian Collared-Dove – Rouse’s in Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  76. Mar. 16: Yellow-throated Warbler – Bayou Corne – Assumption, LA
    yellow-throated warbler - 2016.03.16 - Bayou Corne Sinkhole, LA.16 - Bayou Corne, LA
  77. Mar. 17: Yellow-throated Vireo – Fountainebleu State Park – St. Tammany, LA
  78. Mar. 18: Purple Martin – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  79. Mar. 19: Turkey Vulture – Tunica Hills WMA – West Feliciana, LA
  80. Mar. 20: Black Vulture – Tunica Hills WMA – West Feliciana, LA
  81. Mar. 21: Prothonotary Warbler – New Orleans Central Business District – Orleans, LA
  82. Mar. 22: Laughing Gull – Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  83. Mar. 23: Northern Rough-winged Swallow – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  84. Mar. 24: Red Eyed Vireo – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  85. Mar. 25: Worm-eating Warbler – Audubon Zoo – Orleans, LA
  86. Mar. 26: Chimney Swift – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  87. Mar. 27: Western Sandpiper – Lake Road in Lacombe – St. Tammany, LA
  88. Mar. 28: Red-shouldered Hawk – Northlake Nature Center – St. Tammany, LA
    red-tailed hawk - 2016.05.28 - Covington, LA
  89. Mar. 29: Hooded Warbler – New Orleans Central Business District – Orleans, LA
  90. Mar. 30: Yellow-billed Cuckoo – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  91. Mar. 31: Wood Duck – Coturie Arboretum – St. Tammany, LA
  92. Apr. 1: Tennessee Warbler – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  93. Apr. 2: Solitary Sandpiper – Hogs for the Cause @ NOLA City Park – Orleans, LA
  94. Apr. 3: Wood Thrush – Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center – East Baton Rouge, LA
  95. Apr. 4: White-eyed Vireo – New Orleans Central Business District – Orleans, LA
  96. Apr. 5: Kentucky Warbler* – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  97. Apr. 6: Cedar Waxwing* – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  98. Apr. 7: Common Grackle – Popeye’s in Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  99. Apr. 8: Brown-headed Nuthatch – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  100. Apr. 9: Caspian tern – Lake Road Lacombe – St. Tammany, LA
  101. Apr. 10: Glossy Ibis – Bonnet Carre Spillway – St. Charles, LA
    glossy ibis - 2016.07.01 - St. Catherine Creek NWR, MS-001
  102. Apr. 11: Roseate Spoonbill – Bayou Corne – Assumption, LA
  103. Apr. 12: Anhinga – Bayou Corne – Assumption, LA
  104. Apr. 13: Scarlet Tanager – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  105. Apr. 14: Black-and-White Warbler – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  106. Apr. 15: Ovenbird – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  107. Apr. 16: Wild Turkey* – Frenchtown Road Conservation Area – East Baton Rouge, LA
  108. Apr. 17: Blue-winged Warbler* – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  109. Apr. 18: Fulvous Whistling Duck – Erath crawfish ponds – Vermilion, LA 
  110. Apr. 19: Swainson’s Hawk – Erath cowfield – Vermilion, LA
  111. Apr. 20: Yellow-headed Blackbird – Pecan Island – Vermilion, LA
    yellow-headed blackbird - 2016.04.20 - Pecan Island, LA
  112. Apr. 21: Whimbrel – Kaplan agricultural field – Vermilion, LA
  113. Apr. 22: Sora – Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge – Orleans, LA
  114. Apr. 23: Veery – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  115. Apr. 24: King Rail – Big Branch National Wildlife Refuge – St. Tammany, LA
  116. Apr. 25: Mississippi KIte – my house – St. Tammay, LA
  117. Apr. 26: Pectoral Sandpiper – Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  118. Apr. 27: Chestnut-sided Warbler – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  119. Apr. 28: Bay-breasted Warbler – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  120. Apr. 29: Gray-cheeked Thrush – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  121. Apr. 30: Common Nighthawk – Lowe’s Covington – St. Tammany, LA
  122. May 1: Mallard – 1-12 Denham Springs – Livingston, LA
  123. May 2: Rose-breasted Grosbeak – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  124. May 3: Painted Bunting – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  125. May 4: Black-billed Cuckoo – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  126. May 5: Wilson’s Phalarope – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  127. May 6: Swainson’s Thrush – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  128. May 7: Broad-winged Hawk – Big Branch National Wildlife Refuge – St. Tammany, LA
  129. May 8: Red-cockaded Woodpecker – Big Branch National Wildlife Refuge – St. Tammany, LA
    red-cockaded woodpecker - 2016.05.07 - Big Branch NWR Lacombe, LA
  130. May 9: Magnolia Warbler – West End Park – Orleans, LA
  131. May 10: Stilt Sandpiper – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  132. May 11: White-rumped Sandpiper – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  133. May 12: Semipalmated Sandpiper – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  134. May 13: Eastern Wood-pewee – West End Park – Orleans, LA
  135. May 14: Cliff Swallow – Friends’ Restaurant Madisonville – St. Tammany, LA
  136. May 15: Blue Grosbeak – Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve – St. Tammany, LA
  137. May 16: Lesser Yellowlegs – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  138. May 17: American Redstart – Coturie Arboretum – Orleans, LA
  139. May 18: Least Sandpiper – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  140. May 19: Bronzed Cowbird – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  141. May 20: Ruddy Turnstone – Breakwater Park – Orleans, LA
  142. May 21: Green Heron – Mandeville Lakefront – St. Tammany, LA
  143. May 22: Sandwich Tern – Ladner Pier Waveland – Hancock, MS
  144. May 23: Yellow-crowned Night Heron – Breakwater Park – Orleans, LA
  145. May 24: Great-crested Flycatcher – my house – St. Tammany, LA
    great crested flycatcher - 2016.05.17 - Coturie Arboretum New Orleans, LA-001
  146. May 25: Black-crowned Night Heron – Seabrook Bridge – Orleans, LA
  147. May 26: Mottled Duck – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  148. May 27: Cattle Egret – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  149. May 28: Eastern Kingbird – Fairview Riverside State Park – St. Tammany, LA
  150. May 29: Great Egret – I-12 – St. Tammany, LA
  151. May 30: Pileated Woodpecker – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  152. May 31: Least Bittern – Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge – Orleans, LA
  153. June 1: Orchard Oriole – Point a la Hache Boat Harbor – Plaquemines, LA
  154. June 2: Loggerhead Shrike – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
    loggerhead shrike - 2016.06.02 - Sunset Point Mandeville, LA-001
  155. June 3: Barn Swallow – Mandeville Lakefront – St. Tammany, LA
  156. June 4: Downy Woodpecker – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  157. June 5: Summer Tanager – Sunhillow Berry Farm – St. Tammany, LA
  158. June 6: White Ibis – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  159. June 7: House Finch – Nancy N.’s house Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  160. June 8: Canada Goose – Lakeview Hospital Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  161. June 9: Black Skimmer – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  162. June 10: Least Tern – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
    least tern - 2016.05.22 - Waveland, MS
  163. June 11: Gray Catbird – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  164. June 12: Boat-tailed Grackle – Lake Road in Lacombe – St. Tammany, LA
  165. June 13: Red-bellied Woodpecker – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  166. June 14: Black-bellied Whistling Duck – Lakeview Hospital in Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  167. June 15: Tufted Titmouse – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  168. June 16: Eastern Bluebird – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  169. June 17: Snowy Egret – LeFleur’s Bluff State Park – Hinds, MS
  170. June 18: Eurasian Tree Sparrow – St. Louis, MO
  171. June 19: Dickcissel – Cahokia Mounds – St. Claire, IL
  172. June 20: Indigo Bunting – Lake of the Ozarks State Park – Miller, MO
    indigo bunting - 2016.19.06 - Cahokia Mounds, IL-001
  173. June 21: Prairie Warbler – Ha Ha Tonka State Park – Camdenton, MO
  174. June 22: Hairy Woodpecker – Lake of the Ozarks State Park – Camdenton, MO
  175. June 23: White-breasted Nuthatch – Lake of the Ozarks – Camdenton, MO
  176. June 24: Louisiana Waterthrush – Ha Ha Tonka State Park – Camdenton, MO
  177. June 25: Warbling Vireo – Mammoth Spring State Park – Fulton, AR
    warbling vireo - 2016.06.25 - Mammoth Spring State Park, AR
  178. June 26: Carolina Wren – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  179. June 27: Yellow-breasted Chat – Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge – Concordia, LA
  180. June 28: Inca Dove* – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
  181. June 29: White-faced Ibis – Monterey rice fields – Concordia, LA
  182. June 30: Ruby-throated Hummingbird – near Jonesville – Concordia, LA
  183. July 1: Wood Stork – St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge – Adams, MS
  184. July 2: Willet – Waveland beaches – Hancock, MS
  185. July 3: Great Horned Owl – I-12 near Lacombe – St. Tammany Parish, LA
  186. July 4: Swainson’s Warbler – Old River Wildlife Management Area – Pearl River, MS
  187. July 5: Forster’s Tern – Mandeville Lakefront – St. Tammany, LA
  188. July 6: American Crow – Sunset Point Park Mandeville – St. Tammany, LA
  189. July 7: Black-necked Stilt – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
    DSC_4447
  190. July 8: Tricolored Heron – Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge – Orleans, LA
  191. July 9: Killdeer – Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge – Orleans, LA
  192. July 10: Carolina Chickadee – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  193. July 11: Barred Owl – my neighborhood – St. Tammany, LA
  194. July 12: Blue Jay – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  195. July 13: Northern Mockingbird – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  196. July 14: Red-winged Blackbird – Causeway x Earhart Ponds Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  197. July 15: Florida Scrub-Jay – Jonathan Dickinson State Park – Martin, FL
  198. July 16: Sandhill Crane (Florida) – Airport Lakes Park – Orange, FL
    Sandhill Crane - 2016.07.16 - Orlando Airport Lakes Park, FL
  199. July 17: Reddish Egret – Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge – Brevard, FL
  200. July 18: Northern Bobwhite – Erath Field – Vermilion, LA
  201. July 19: Cave Swallow – Mouton Cove – Vermilion, LA
  202. July 20: Great-tailed Grackle – Erath Field – Vermilion, LA
  203. July 21: Bank Swallow – Erath Field – Vermilion, LA
  204. July 22: House Sparrow – New Orleans CBD – Orleans, LA
  205. July 23: Mourning Dove – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  206. July 24: Northern Cardinal – my house – St. Tammany, LA
  207. July 25: Spotted Sandpiper – Breakwater Park – Orleans, LA
  208. July 26: European Starling – Metairie – Jefferson, LA
  209. July 27: Rock Pigeon – Metairie – Jefferson, LA

Thanks for reading!

-Jody